Tag Archives: type 2 diabetes

4 Lifestyle Changes to Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Carlos let´s go

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Carlos let´s go

For those with a high risk of Type 2 diabetes — 86 million Americans over the age of 20, according to the American Diabetes Association — glucose is the name of the game.

Glucose, the main type of sugar that circulates in your Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Fed Up: No Time to Watch? Here are the Top 7 Takeaways

sugar is sugar_WellnessFX_FedUp

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, howzey

Fed Up is the latest in a series of documentaries that are ripping open the food industry to inform the consumer. The Katie Couric- and Laurie David-produced film is currently only showing in select locations, so it might be a while until it hits a theater close to you. Since we’re based in San Francisco and it’s playing in our area, it made sense for us to take the time to view it and share our takeaways. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

It’s World Diabetes Day. Have You Been Tested Recently?

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Carol Browne

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Carol Browne

November 14th is World Diabetes Day,* created to spread awareness of type 2 diabetes and to bring attention to promising medical advancements that can help people avoid or manage the disease.

Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disease, and its prevalence is growing around the world. Hundreds of millions of people have the condition, and what’s worse, nearly half of them have no idea. The damage the disease does to the body puts these people at risk of developing a number of other serious issues like cardiovascular disease, kidney failure, blindness, and loss of limbs.

In the US, more than 5,000 people per day learn that that they have this life-threatening, life-long disease. But fortunately, like many diseases, it doesn’t happen overnight. Early detection and lifestyle changes often allow people to bring their blood glucose levels back into the normal range before permanent effects settle in. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

When in Stockholm: Sweden Goes Low-Carb High-Fat for Health and Weight-Loss

credit: Google CC

credit: Google CC

The independent Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU) looked at 16,000 studies published through May 31 of this year, and the publication of their surprising findings led to a national change in dietary advice.

This marks the first time that a country has developed national dietary guidelines based around low-carb high-fat nutrition. It’s taken them a while to get there, but their success in changing the national discussion is the result of dedication, careful research, and self-experimentation. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Why WellnessFX Is Needed Now

credit: Instagram @lyzewestgate

credit: Instagram @lyzewestgate

Metabolic syndrome is becoming more and more common in the United States. According to PubMed, metabolic syndrome is “a name for a group of risk factors that occur together and increase the risk for coronary artery diseasestroke, and type 2 diabetes.” The two most important risk factors are extra weight around the middle and upper parts of the body, and insulin resistance.

We recently came across a blog post written by an individual who has been living with metabolic syndrome for a while now. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at the age of 17 which, understandably, came as a big shock. Like many kids, he wasn’t paying that much attention to his health or what he was eating. Just 50 years ago, this might not have been a big deal. Now, however, with kids becoming more and more sedentary with video games and computers, and the declining quality of our food, metabolic disorders are catching up with us quicker.

Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Tips for Treating Type 2 Diabetes

Today’s guest post on Diabetes comes from Dr. Pullen, a family doctor from Puyallup, WA and writes a health blog where he posts regularly on topics of interest to patients and physicians alike.

Many patients with diabetes focus a great deal of their energy on controlling their blood sugar levels.  This is important, but is only one of the important goals of an overall treatment plan for a diabetic patient. The major long term problems related to type 2 diabetes are related to the cardiovascular system, and include heart attacks, strokes and peripheral artery disease.  There is a large body of evidence that supports aggressive control of blood pressure and cholesterol as well as smoking cessation as factors at least as important as blood sugar control in the prevention or delay of development of these diabetes complications.

Smoking cessation: Quitting smoking may be the most important of all the things you can do as a diabetic to prevent cardiovascular complications. Your risk of these problems goes down dramatically and quickly after quitting, so work with your physician to find a way to quit.

Optimal Blood Pressure Control: For patients with diabetes the goal blood pressure is lower than in the non-diabetic patient, and many if not most patients require a blood pressure medication to achieve the typical goal blood pressure of >120/80.  The blood pressure medications in the class called ACE inhibitors or ARBs have the added benefit of protecting the kidney function, and are often the first choice of blood pressure medication for diabetic patients.  Many patients will require a combination of 2 or more blood pressure medications to achieve their goal numbers.

Cholesterol Control:  Diet, exercise and achieving optimal weight are important in keeping the LDL cholesterol at the goal for diabetic patients of <100, with ideal LDL <70.  With goals this low most patients require treatment with a statin class of medication to get to goal.  Good news is that most of these drugs are now available as generics at very affordable prices and they are very effective at lowering LDL cholesterol.

Blood Sugar Control: I list this last on purpose. Although it is important to keep blood sugars in control, it can be among the most difficult aspects of diabetes management for many patients. Getting the HbA1C, which measures blood sugar levels over the last month, under 8% is very important, and goal for many patients is <6.5%, but this is not more important than the control of blood pressure and LDL cholesterol which may be easier to achieve.

Be sure to discuss with your physician your progress towards all of these important aspects of diabetes care, and work with them to be sure you don’t neglect any of these issues.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.