Tag Archives: saturated fat

KIND Snack Bars Under Scrutiny – Here’s What We Think the FDA Completely Overlooked

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Arthur Hsu

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Arthur Hsu

If you’ve ever ransacked a grocery or convenience store shelf for a quick snack, chances are you’ve seen KIND bars. Their packaging, complete with clear plastic windows, messages transparency in ingredients, while the labeling and marketing touts the bar as a healthy choice.

As it turns out, recent scrutiny in the form of a letter from the FDA has called out that four of KIND’s bars do not comply with FDA requirements regarding the amount of saturated fat content found in a “healthy” product and therefore cannot bear the “healthy” label or marketing speak.

According to the FDA, in order for a product to be labeled “healthy,” it must have fewer than one gram of saturated fat per serving. The saturated fat content in KIND bars are as follows: Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Should We Eat Low Fat? How The Government’s Upcoming Guidelines Will Affect You

Flickr creative commons, pj_vanf

Flickr creative commons, pj_vanf

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee recently released their advisory report to the Secretaries of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). This is not the official guideline for Americans, but suggestions made to help influence the policy, which will be published this year. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Why Fat Doesn’t Make You Fat (and What Kinds to Eat)

Credit: Wikimedia, Muffet

Credit: Wikimedia, Muffet

Fat has long been feared as the enemy, and thought to be responsible for chronic diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD), obesity and the general expanding waistlines. “Fat makes you fat” led to the avoidance of the substance.

More research has had different findings – such as there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. In this study published by NCBI, it was even reported that eating fat actually promotes satiety, which aids in weight loss and management, and that certain fats, when used in moderation, have the potential to help your body in many ways. Various studies have also observed that fats: Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

The Trans-fat Ban. A Nationwide Step in a Healthier Direction.

credit: Don Partlan, Flickr

credit: Don Partlan, Flickr

In the early- to mid-1900s, the use of trans-fats skyrocketed, because they were easy to use, had a long shelf-life, and were extremely cost effective to produce. And far from making consumers feel deprived of saturated fats, trans-fats gave foods a taste and texture that many craved. It was even believed that trans-fats were a healthy substitute for saturated fat, but over the years evidence has proven that exactly the opposite is true.

As early as the 1950s, rumbles in the scientific community began, wondering if the trans-fats boom was leading to the large increase of coronary artery disease seen across the country. But it wasn’t until the 1990s that the potentially negative effects of trans-fats were given serious attention.

Now, in 2014, we’ve reached another milestone. The FDA is removing trans-fats from the Generally Regarded As Safe (GRAS) list—making the unhealthy fats effectively banned. This proposal eliminates the loophole that let manufacturers label their foods as having 0 grams of trans-fats per serving if they contain less than half a gram. With multiple servings, those levels of trans-fats add up, meaning that consumers would be able to eat dangerous levels without even knowing it. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.