Tag Archives: practitioners

How a WellnessFX Consultation Works and What to Expect

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Melissa Venable

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Melissa Venable

If you’ve never had a WellnessFX practitioner provide you with personalized advice based on your biomarkers, we can understand – new can be scary.

If you don’t know what to expect, that can cause even more trepidation. Never fear! We’ve got you covered. No matter what you’re curious about, from women’s health to endurance training to weight loss, a consultation is an opportunity to leverage the data that’s now in your back pocket and identify potential health risks or areas of improvement. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

“You made me feel good about my health!”

credit: iStock @drbimages

credit: iStock @drbimages

What’s unique about WellnessFX isn’t just the wide variety of biomarker testing it overs with its Baseline, Performance, and Thyroid packages, but the deep insight, knowledge, and guidance you get with that information. Our practitioners and the personalized consults they provide are such a big part of what makes WellnessFX, we can’t over-emphasis how awesome they are!

WellnessFX practitioners:

  1. Are either MD’s, certified dietitians, certified personal trainers, or naturopathic physicians.
  2. Look over member results beforehand to maximize your time.
  3. Are focused on prevention and getting to the root of the cause.
  4. Prefer natural solutions over medications.
  5. Compile notes and supply personalized written recommendations so members can give 100% attention during the actual consult.

Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

What Members Have To Say About WellnessFX Practitioners

WellnessFX has been rapidly expanding: we’re opening up in new states left and right! That means a lot more people will be hearing about us. We frequently share our member testimonials on the blog to give a clear picture of the WellnessFX experience for any new-comers. But our practitioners and the personalized consults they provide are such a big part of what makes WellnessFX a success that we can’t over-emphasis how awesome they are!

WellnessFX practitioners:

  • Are either MD’s, certified dietitians, certified personal trainers, or naturopathic physicians.
  • Look over member results beforehand to maximize your time.
  • Are focused on prevention and getting to the root of the cause.
  • Prefer natural solutions over medications.
  • Compile notes and supply personalized written recommendations so members can give 100% attention during the actual consult.

Here’s a compilation of what our members have to say about their WellnessFX practitioner.

Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

WellnessFX: Healthy Insights, Healthy Body, Healthy Mind

Rachel Quotes 1

Rachel knows that real health isn’t only about how you look, or how you feel. Like the old adage goes, it’s what’s on the inside that counts.

She came to WellnessFX through the FitFluential campaign already with this mindset. Still, WellnessFX “absolutely’ exceeded her expectations.

Although WellnessFX was not yet available in Massachusetts (we’re working on it!), Rachel traveled to her home town in Connecticut to have her draw. She documented her experience pretty thoroughly on her blog. Here’s a quick summary:

Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

5 Steps to Choosing Your Integrative Medicine Practitioner

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, AnimaBandit

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, AnimaBandit

When faced with a multitude of options, it’s easy to leave decision-making up to the close-your-eyes and point method. The Whack-a-Mole method might be an OK way to decide which party to attend or which pair of pants to wear, but when it comes to choosing an integrative medicine practitioner, you’ll want to make an informed decision.

Integrative health care, also known as alternative or complementary medicine, used to be seen as a rejection of mainstream medicine because consumers often chose to rely solely on the alternative – like homeopathy or Reiki. Since then, many consumers have taken a more integrative approach by augmenting, rather than replacing, their primary health care with alternative practices.

Over time, mainstream physicians have also become more accepting of the integrative approach, even without conclusive clinical evidence, because consumers are demanding it and claiming better health outcomes. Integrative Medicine is now taught, practiced and researched in nearly half the medical schools in the country, including many leading universities such as Duke and Stanford. And, recent evidence showing the success of Integrative Medicine in clinical studies has brought it into the conversation on health care reform as well.

Because of its growing acceptance and popularity, there are many more integrative health care practitioners to choose from which can be overwhelming when it comes to deciding who to work with.

What’s the best way to go about finding an integrative health practitioner? Everyone has their own unique approach to decision-making. People also come to their need for alternative medicine from many different angles. You may have witnessed a friend with a similar health issue recover dramatically, and want to pursue that option yourself.  Or your health care provider may be recommending an alternative approach in addition to their care.  Or you may have heard about it on TV or through other media sources. Whichever way you come to it and no matter how you tend to make decisions, here are some basic guidelines to help in your process.

5 Steps to Choosing Your Integrative Medicine Practitioner 

1. Have a goal.

We’ve talked about the imporance of goal setting before. Don’t do it just because everyone else is doing it, and don’t follow someone else’s protocol.  Know for yourself what your issue is, why you want to pursue an alternative therapy and what your expectations and boundaries are.

2. Do a little research.

Look into this practice and determine 1) What it is and 2) What types of issues it’s best suited for.

3. Get a referral if you can.

It may come through a friend who has worked with someone who was helpful. You could even ask your primary health care provider for a referral.  A hospital or medical school near you may have a listing of local practitioners either online or by request.  Also, there are many professional organizations for specific practitioner groups which are great resources.   A good place to start is the Alternative Medicine Foundation or The Foundation for Alternative and Integrative Medicine (FAIM).

4. Shop around.  

Once you have a few practitioners in mind, look into their education and experience. Check out their credentials on their website. Call them up for more information about cost, and if they’re amenable, ask some questions about their experience treating patients with problems similar to yours, and their philosophy of care.

5. Make an appointment.

At your first meeting, you could ask about benefits, risks, scientific studies to back up this therapy’s use, and how long treatment will take.  Consider how comfortable you are with the person, how confident you feel in their abilities, and how well you feel they answered your questions.

Relax and engage in the process once you’ve found someone you like, respect and trust.  It’s your body, mind and spirit and you are a partner with your health care practitioners in your own well-being. Feel good knowing you’re doing something positive for yourself.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Can the Healthcare Industry Become More Social?

Social media has become part of all of our daily lives – just look at the number of smartphones issued, tweets sent and lives lived out on Facebook. Americans spend nearly 25% of their time online on average. We live in an unprecedented time for open and effective communication among health practitioners sharing knowledge, and doctors communicating directly and broadly with patients.  So how has the changing consumer landscape impacted the health industry?Consumers are better informed about their own health. For the first time in human history, it’s easy for anyone to access information about myriad health topics and to be in touch with others about these issues via social networks. The many available options include Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, comments posted to a blog, YouTube, wikis, chat rooms, and other social networking sites in addition to a host of health information sites.

There is an expectation among consumers that they can use social media to connect with hospitals and healthcare professionals just as they do in every other part of their lives. Also, today’s patients are more empowered to use social media to take charge of their own health and to join online health communities in this endeavor. A spokesperson for the online physician learning collaborative QuantiaMD said most physicians were not familiar with online patient communities but those who were saw them as having a very high impact on patients and viewed them positively.

The medical community has had a mixed reaction to this demand.  Doctors are already some of the most social media-friendly members of society.   According to a survey by QuantiaMD, 87% of physicians make personal use of social media, and a slightly lesser amount, 67%, use it professionally.  Experts say high social media use among physicians is probably related to their rapid adoption of smartphone and mobile devices.

But regulation has been difficult. Mainly, the medical establishment has been slow to get on board because of the risks involved.  Primary among them is the well-founded fear of violating strict patient-privacy laws otherwise known as HIPAA.

A few years ago at a couple hospitals, situations arose in which patient confidentiality was either breached or potentially breached which led to a crackdown on social policy usage.  In 2009, New England Baptist Hospital and other Boston-area hospitals banned staff from social media sites, citing HIPAA compliance, patient privacy fears and concerns over workplace productivity.

Last year, Dr. Alexandra Thran, 48, was fired from Westerly Hospital in Rhode Island, reprimanded by the state medical board and banned from working in the emergency room for posting information online about a trauma patient. Partly as a response to this incident, an editorial was recently published by the Annals of Internal Medicine which recommended that physicians not communicate directly with patients through social media, and that they rely on email or secure portals instead.

Today, most hospitals have generally stepped up to create guidelines for their staff’s conduct with respect to social media.  Most are open to their doctors and other health practitioners being part of professional or peer-to-peer networks in order to share expertise and further their education.  But they are not as open to doctors sharing information with clients or patients.

Recently, Stanford University deemed that doctor participation in Internet “chats or consultations” would be treated as the practice of medicine and governed by the Rules of Practice for the Physicians and Psychologists in the School of Medicine. This ruling has many implications for how Doctors practice medicine in an increasingly digitized world. One where Doctors are the ones using social media and their smartphone perhaps more frequently than their patients.

Hospitals are rightfully concerned about protecting the privacy of their patients, but there seems to be a push from both the doctor and patient side to allow some level of interaction. The medical industry will need to evolve with the changing times to figure out how to serve consumers demands and support Doctors’ use of advanced technology and communication methods. The health industry needs to get more personal.

Clearly, social media is here to stay. The healthcare establishment is starting to get onboard, and over time one hopes it will create regulations that allow freedom of information, useful interaction and simultaneously protect people’s privacy.  Who knows what Social Media may look like in the future but in the meantime, these new ways of communicating seem to be rapidly becoming an integral part of the healthcare system.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.