Tag Archives: obesity

When in Stockholm: Sweden Goes Low-Carb High-Fat for Health and Weight-Loss

credit: Google CC

credit: Google CC

The independent Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU) looked at 16,000 studies published through May 31 of this year, and the publication of their surprising findings led to a national change in dietary advice.

This marks the first time that a country has developed national dietary guidelines based around low-carb high-fat nutrition. It’s taken them a while to get there, but their success in changing the national discussion is the result of dedication, careful research, and self-experimentation. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Be Your Best Self: Keep Off The Pounds At Social Gatherings

 

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credit: Instagram @ssarahlee__

credit: Instagram @ssarahlee__

Family dinners, potlucks, traveling, and even just a long day of meetings at work are sure-fire ways to get off track. When visiting family on vacation, offering to do the grocery shopping can ensure a gathering over fresh, organic, and natural ingredients. It’s also an extremely nice gesture.

Although we debunked the snacking myth a while back, it is still a good way to keep up the healthy routine while on the go, and can save you from succumbing to fast-food while away from home. If going on a trip, a three-pound bag of mixed nuts, dried fruit, and dark chocolate pieces is both healthy and delicious, fits easily in your carry-on, and will last you a week. Before leaving on your trip, grab a handful and weigh it on a scale. Now you’ll always have a rough idea how much you’re snacking on!

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Guest Post: The Importance of Detoxification

credit: iStock @adlifemarketing

credit: iStock @adlifemarketing

Never before in human history have we been exposed to such high levels of toxins. There has been an explosion in the number of studies showing the effects of these environmental chemicals on human health. There are estimated to be approximately 100,000 chemicals now in commerce, 30,000 of which are in common use and only 3,500 of which have been safely tested. Throughout our daily life we are in constant contact with environmental toxins. It isn’t hard to believe they are playing a role in modern illness like birth defects, nervous system disorders, strokes, heart attacks, diabetes, and cancer.

Where are these toxins coming from?

We absorb toxins through our skin, from the air we breathe, the chemicals in our foods, and from the chemicals released in our homes and workplaces. They all add to our body’s toxic load. Ideally, on a daily basis, our bodies break down these toxins and clear them away. Detoxification is simply normalizing the body’s ability to process and excrete toxins.

To support the detoxification process, the body requires a variety of nutrients. If these nutrients are in low supply, the toxins re-circulate. These unneutralized, fat-soluble toxins can be stored in body tissues such as fat, brain and nervous system causing systemic symptoms and future disease processes.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Testosterone, Obesity, and Heart Disease

testosterone word in letterpress

credit: iStock @marekuliasz

When you hear the word testosterone, you probably think of masculinity, working out in the gym, and how efficiently someone can put on muscle and lose fat. Turns out, that’s only half the story.

As science dives deeper and deeper into these biomarkers, we’re finding that nothing is as cut and dry as we might have once thought. The body is a huge, complex, integrated system.

WebMD recently did an informative article on the correlations between low testosterone levels in men and a number of metabolic disorders, from diabetes and obesity to high blood pressure and heart disease.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Chilling the Fat Away

credit: Instagram @_haiibeautiful

credit: Instagram @_haiibeautiful

Have you ever delighted at the idea of working out in a hot gym or on a sunny, sweltering day because of all the extra calories you can imagine sweating through your pores? Or maybe you’ve sat for long periods of time in a sauna after a workout? Soaked in a hot bath to loosen up the muscles?

We aren’t knocking these methods, as heat exposure promotes blood flow to your skin, which can help with muscle repair and relaxation. But what if we told you cold showers, working out in the snow, and ice baths could be just as useful, if not more-so?

Do we have your attention? Good. Self-experimenter Tim Ferriss and popular personal trainer Ben Greenfield have both delved deep into cold thermogenesis over the past couple year. Each has incorporated various techniques into their regimens. An interesting trivia fact first led Tim Ferriss down the road of cold exposure: at a time, Michael Phelps was known to eat 12,000 calories per day. How was that possible, considering he’d have to swim continuously for 10 hours every single day to burn off that kind of intake? Then it hit him: Michael Phelps spent 3-4 hours a day in the water, which is 24 times more thermally conductive than air. His body was burning all those calories just to stay warm.

If he can, why can’t we?

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

“Sitting Is Killing You”

credit: Instagram @yuki_eye

People who sit for most of their day are 54% more likely to die of a heart attack.

Did that get your attention? We hope so (and, no, we didn’t make that up).

We’ve talked about the benefits of getting off your hind quarters and spending more of your day on your feet.

To put things into perspective, here’s what sitting physically does to your body:

  1. As soon as you sit the electrical activity in the leg muscles shut off, calorie burning slows to a sloth-like 1 per minute, and enzymes that help break down fat drop by 90%.
  2. After 2 hours of reclining in your favorite chair, the good cholesterol in your body drops about 20%.
  3. After 24 hours insulin effectiveness drops 24% and risk of diabetes rises.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.