Tag Archives: ldl

Cholesterol: We’ve Been Wrong All Along

credit: Flickr CC

credit: Flickr CC

If you’ve spent any time thinking about your cholesterol, you know the basics: LDL is bad. HDL is good. But beyond that glib distinction, numerous studies and real-world outcomes show that we still have much to discuss.

For many years, we’ve known that cholesterol plays a key role in cardiovascular health. No one will argue against the fact that high cholesterol is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. But as science advances, so does our understanding of cholesterol and how it affects the body. What we’ve thought about cholesterol for decades may have been incorrect, requiring us—along with researchers and healthcare professionals—to rethink our position and take an unbiased look at new data.   Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

One Woman’s Story of Unexplained Weight Gain and What She Learned Was Actually Happening

deborah_alexanderIt started 4 years ago. Within a span of one year, Deborah gained about 30 pounds. She wasn’t pregnant and she hadn’t changed her diet or workout routine.

She had always had genetically elevated cholesterol, but it began to grow even higher along with her weight gain.

What made it even stranger was that Deborah was competing on a master’s rowing team, lifting weights with a trainer, swimming, and watching what she was eating. There was no visibly apparent reason that she should have been gaining weight. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

The Rebooted Body Interview With WellnessFX CEO Jim Kean – Part I

Want to learn more about WellnessFX? Who better than from the man who started it all: CEO Jim Kean. He recently sat down with Kevin Geary of the Rebooted Body to discuss the WellnessFX process, the variety of panels we offer, and the current healthcare revolution to take control of your own health data.

The Rebooted Body is an online program that helps you reach your fitness goals through natural, holistic methods. They upkeep a regular and informative blog and podcast to share health news, tips, and methods for leading a healthy life. We are very grateful for the opportunity to discuss how we’re setting out to change preventive medicine and hope you take the time to check out the Rebooted Body’s awesome platform!

The interview is long (a whole hour!) so we’re splitting the summary into three parts. Today we’re talking about the background of WellnessFX. In parts two and three, we’ll dive into the various panels you can choose from and how WellnessFX is trying to improve the system.

Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Tips for Treating Type 2 Diabetes

Today’s guest post on Diabetes comes from Dr. Pullen, a family doctor from Puyallup, WA and writes a health blog where he posts regularly on topics of interest to patients and physicians alike.

Many patients with diabetes focus a great deal of their energy on controlling their blood sugar levels.  This is important, but is only one of the important goals of an overall treatment plan for a diabetic patient. The major long term problems related to type 2 diabetes are related to the cardiovascular system, and include heart attacks, strokes and peripheral artery disease.  There is a large body of evidence that supports aggressive control of blood pressure and cholesterol as well as smoking cessation as factors at least as important as blood sugar control in the prevention or delay of development of these diabetes complications.

Smoking cessation: Quitting smoking may be the most important of all the things you can do as a diabetic to prevent cardiovascular complications. Your risk of these problems goes down dramatically and quickly after quitting, so work with your physician to find a way to quit.

Optimal Blood Pressure Control: For patients with diabetes the goal blood pressure is lower than in the non-diabetic patient, and many if not most patients require a blood pressure medication to achieve the typical goal blood pressure of >120/80.  The blood pressure medications in the class called ACE inhibitors or ARBs have the added benefit of protecting the kidney function, and are often the first choice of blood pressure medication for diabetic patients.  Many patients will require a combination of 2 or more blood pressure medications to achieve their goal numbers.

Cholesterol Control:  Diet, exercise and achieving optimal weight are important in keeping the LDL cholesterol at the goal for diabetic patients of <100, with ideal LDL <70.  With goals this low most patients require treatment with a statin class of medication to get to goal.  Good news is that most of these drugs are now available as generics at very affordable prices and they are very effective at lowering LDL cholesterol.

Blood Sugar Control: I list this last on purpose. Although it is important to keep blood sugars in control, it can be among the most difficult aspects of diabetes management for many patients. Getting the HbA1C, which measures blood sugar levels over the last month, under 8% is very important, and goal for many patients is <6.5%, but this is not more important than the control of blood pressure and LDL cholesterol which may be easier to achieve.

Be sure to discuss with your physician your progress towards all of these important aspects of diabetes care, and work with them to be sure you don’t neglect any of these issues.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.