Tag Archives: ldl

4 Causes of High Triglyceride Levels and Ways to Lower Your Own Levels

Credit: iStock Photo

Triglycerides are the main type of fat (lipid) in your blood.

Too high a level of triglycerides can make you more resistant to insulin and can result in such diseases as heart disease, diabetes, fatty liver, and stroke.

Triglycerides are also closely related to HDL cholesterol (a.k.a. the “good cholesterol”), because having higher amounts of HDL can help carry these fatty deposits of triglycerides away from blood vessels and be protective. The clogging of blood vessels commonly associated with triglycerides is called atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Because your arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood to your heart and other parts of your body, it is important to have the proper balance of triglycerides with artery-clearing HDL cholesterol.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Time to Check Your Cholesterol? Don’t Forget This Important Number

Credit: iStockPhoto

Credit: iStockPhoto

Not all cholesterol increases your risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease– your risk is determined by the balance of various types. But how can you assess this balance? Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

The Truth About Chocolate and How You Actually Benefit From It

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, On Eyes Photography

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, On Eyes Photography

Junk food is a slow killer. It’s making you diabetic, raising your blood pressure, and threatens to shut down your heart before the age of 50. No one really argues with how important diet is to long-term health. You are what you eat.

The question is, then: What is junk food?

Think about five foods you consider junk. Was chocolate one of your choices?

Should it be?

More and more we are learning that it’s less the what of the food we eat, but the how in the way it’s prepared. A hamburger from McDonald’s is bad, but what about a homemade grass-fed burger with gluten-free bread, and organic cheese? French fries are the worst, right? How about some sweet potato strips baked to a crunchy crisp in the oven?

Maybe it’s time to have another look at chocolate. While a Snickers bar a day won’t keep the doctor away, could this ‘guilty pleasure’ food be misunderstood?

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

H1N1 is deadly: Warning signs, prevention tips and what you need to track

In California alone, it was recently reported that this season’s flu has taken 56 additional young and middle-aged lives, with almost all being confirmed as the H1N1 swine flu virus. So far, the total number of flu season deaths in California, as reported by the California Department of Public Health, is at 202. For perspective, the total number of deaths reported for the entire 2012-2013 influenza season was 106.

antioxidant water to support immunity

Credit: Instagram, Ignaaac
Water tip: Adding lemon to your water adds antioxidants that help inflammation and support immunity.

While this year’s Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Statins for Everybody? A Closer Look at the New Statin Guidelines.

spilled_pillsIf you’ve been following the news, it’s likely that you’ve seen the controversy raging about the new statin guidelines for cardiovascular health, risk, and treatment.

In short, the new guidelines have changed dramatically, moving away from using LDL as the key measure of CV health, and instead focusing on age, lifestyle, race, and other factors to determine who is most at risk. What’s alarming to many is that the new recommendations make millions more people eligible for long-term preventive treatment with statins. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

The Trans-fat Ban. A Nationwide Step in a Healthier Direction.

credit: Don Partlan, Flickr

credit: Don Partlan, Flickr

In the early- to mid-1900s, the use of trans-fats skyrocketed, because they were easy to use, had a long shelf-life, and were extremely cost effective to produce. And far from making consumers feel deprived of saturated fats, trans-fats gave foods a taste and texture that many craved. It was even believed that trans-fats were a healthy substitute for saturated fat, but over the years evidence has proven that exactly the opposite is true.

As early as the 1950s, rumbles in the scientific community began, wondering if the trans-fats boom was leading to the large increase of coronary artery disease seen across the country. But it wasn’t until the 1990s that the potentially negative effects of trans-fats were given serious attention.

Now, in 2014, we’ve reached another milestone. The FDA is removing trans-fats from the Generally Regarded As Safe (GRAS) list—making the unhealthy fats effectively banned. This proposal eliminates the loophole that let manufacturers label their foods as having 0 grams of trans-fats per serving if they contain less than half a gram. With multiple servings, those levels of trans-fats add up, meaning that consumers would be able to eat dangerous levels without even knowing it. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.