Tag Archives: holiday

5 Tips to Combat Holiday Stress, Aches and Pains

Credit: rachel_titiriga, Flickr Commons

Credit: rachel_titiriga, Flickr Commons

Got back pain? Try eating some eggs.

Stress in the form of stiff necks and backs and weak immune systems doesn’t sound like a fun time. While the holidays mean exciting times with friends and family, the addition of travel, parties, and overall hustle and bustle can take a toll on our bodies. While it is common to blame it on lengthy layovers, cold and flu season, and cramped airplane seats, you may be overlooking what one billion worldwide are deficient in: Vitamin D. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Planning a Healthy Holiday Party

This time of year, our waist line grows as our patience shortens with the rush of the holidays around us. However, there is nothing better than celebrating with family friends, and co-workers.  But those endless trays of pigs wrapped in a blanket and decadent cheese platters can take their toll. What is a health minded individual to do when planning a festive, yet nutritious, holiday event?

Remember, it’s what we do 80% of the time that gives us the 20% to play with, notes our sage nutrition advisor, Johanna Thorn, N.C. Johanna has provided us with some helpful tips to make this holiday both happier and healthier. Not only did she provide us with her favorite holiday treats, but also her guarded recipe for mulled wine. Mmmmmm.

Nibbles & Noshes

  • Stuff mushroom caps with pesto (use your favorite organic premade version from your local health food grocery store) and bake
  • Skewer 2-3 shrimp, coat with pesto and place under broiler until shrimp turns pink
  • Create a beautiful antipasti plate with several flavors of olives (brown and green are always welcome), two to three types of living crackers, a variety of cheeses, a few of your favorite micro greens, sundried tomatoes, roasted red peppers, pickles and raw unpasteurized sauerkraut
  • Make a fresh herb dip for warm crusty bread:  blend 1-2 cups of your favorite fresh herbs (oregano, thyme, sage, parsley, chives or basil, chives, cilantro with a dash of sea salt) with 1-2 cups olive oil or for a non carb option drizzle over Greek yogurt, feta cubes or cottage cheese. These can be served in decorative individual cups or shot glasses.
  • Who doesn’t love hot soup on a cold day: serve it as an hors d’oeuvre using decorative shot glasses, garnish with fresh micro greens or a small dollop of the above herb mixture, or fresh grated Parmesan
  • To satisfy your sweet tooth, pick up some organic truffles from your favorite supplier or organic ice creams in delicious holiday flavors like peppermint, pumpkin, eggnog and top with candied roasted nuts such as pecans, walnuts; served in decorative individual serving cups

Beverages

  • Traditional and non-dairy eggnog: Johann’s favorite – So Delicious Dairy free Nog coconut milk beverage; sprinkle with cinnamon, nutmeg
  • Mulled wine – a holiday staple! See Johann’s recipe below.

Mulled Wine Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 bottles organic sulphite free red wine
  • ½ cup filtered water
  • ¼ cup organic raw sugar or can use organic raw agave (1/8 cup)
  • 4 sticks cinnamon
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 1 organic orange – sliced into rounds
  • 1 organic lemon – sliced into rounds
  1. Add water, sugar, cinnamon and cloves into a pot and set on stove top
  2. Bring mixture to a slow boil for 5 minutes and stir. Remove from heat for several minutes
  3. Add wine slowly while stirring along with orange and lemon
  4. Warm on low heat for 40 minutes without boiling.
  5. Strain wine and serve!

Share your favorite holiday treats below!

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Creative Health Gifts for the Holidays: Acupuncture

During this season of generosity, we are all looking for creative gifts for the important people in our lives. DVD collections, the newest gadget and cozy sweaters are always welcome.  Here at WellnessFX we always look to provide the gift of good health. This year try expanding your loved ones’ healthcare horizons and introducing them to an alternative medical option that could augment their more modern regimens: acupuncture.

Even in this technology-driven, scientific age, there are many forms of traditional treatments like acupuncture, nutrition and massage that can provide relief for our more modern maladies. Through both anecdotal and experimental evidence, it has become increasingly clear that these ancient options can provide substantial health benefits.

Acupuncture has received accolades for contributing to relieve ailments as diverse as fibromyalgia, cancer, osteoporosis and chronic pain. The medical uses of acupuncture go back 5,000 years as a key element of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), but it didn’t emerge in the mainstream American medical vocabulary until the 1970s. Since then, researchers have tried to measure and quantify the results of acupuncture and determine its value as part of an integrated medical approach.

TCM asserts that the energy in our bodies is balanced through the forces of yin and yang that can be destabilized by disease. This, in turn, disrupts the flow of qi, or vital energy, that courses through meridians and surges throughout the body. Acupuncture administered along the intersections of these meridians frees these channels and restores your qi. According to some sources, there are up to 2,000 acupuncture points throughout the body that can be affected through the practice.

Over the last few decades, strides have been made in the healthcare community towards recognizing the important role that acupuncture can play for patients. In 1996, the National Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved acupuncture needles as a medical device, and nowadays many insurance providers will help cover acupuncture as an accepted treatment.

For those that have not experienced acupuncture, the process can vary based on the individual, but consists of hair-thin needles strategically inserted over your body. Some people find the process invigorating, while others find themselves more relaxed. The relationship with your acupuncturist is important, and you must make sure that they are aware of any other treatments or medications that you are taking. While the practitioner may go into the session with a plan for how to tackle your particular medical complaints, acupuncture has been compared to an “art form” because of the delicacy in reading each individual reaction and adapting the treatment.

Multiple studies have confirmed that acupuncture holds real value in pain and nausea management with the benefit of causing limited side effects. As with any treatments, make sure that you consult your doctor before undergoing acupuncture. Also, be sure to find a licensed practitioner with the proper knowledge and training to administer this delicate treatment.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.