Tag Archives: heart disease

HIIT Plus Standing: Match Made in Heaven?

credit: iStock @creacart

credit: iStock @creacart

You hit the gym early in the morning, warm-up, stretch, and then go to work. After ten minutes or twenty or an hour of intensity, you’re toast. It was the kind of workout that leaves you soaked in sweat and flat on your back, gasping for air even though you can’t help but smile. What a feeling!

When you’re ready, you peel yourself off the gym floor, pat yourself on the back, and then . . .

. . . you sit all day. Whether it’s at a desk on the weekdays or in front of a television on the weekends, your time outside the gym is all about sitting. Does this sound like you?

The Dilemma

Numerous studies have shown that high intensity interval training (known as HIIT) is just as or more beneficial for overall health and athleticism when compared to longer bouts of lower to moderate-intensity exercise. For example, a 2008 study found that 2.5 hours of sprint interval training produced similar muscle and endurance improvements as 10.5 hours of endurance training. Another study found that HIIT’s effects stick with you long after you leave the gym, increasing the resting metabolic rate for 24 hours. The famous Tabata 1997 study (one of the foundations of CrossFit) concluded that “intermittent exercise . . . may tax both the anaerobic and aerobic energy releasing systems almost maximally.”

A recent study, however, set out to challenge some of these claims. Published last week in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE, the study followed eighteen healthy individuals between the ages of 19 and 23 who were randomly assigned to three physical activity regimes for four days. They were split up into three groups and were instructed to either a) sit 14 hours per day b) sit 13 hours per day and exercise for 1 hour per day and c) sit 6 hours, walk 4 hours, and stand two hours per day. While the 1-hour workout group showed the same energy expenditures per day as the minimal intensity group, insulin levels and plasma lipids in the minimal intensity group were significantly better than the sitting group. The same could not be said for the group with 1-hour of daily physical exercise.

Does this mean high-intensity exercise is not as beneficial as we once thought?

We’ve talked about ideas suggesting that one hour (or less) of exercise a day cannot make up for 23 hours of inactivity no matter how intense you make it (see Sitting is Killing You). In fact, people who sit for most of the day are 54% more likely to die of a heart attack, regardless of exercise. So while exercising for six hours a day (whether it’s by taking long walks or going on a treadmill marathon at the gym) will help eliminate some of the problems of chronic sitting, you still may be missing out on all the benefits of high-intensity training (not to mention 6 hours of exercise a day just isn’t sustainable for everyone).

The Take-Away

While there are benefits to HIIT over regular exercise, it alone does not make up for an extremely sedentary lifestyle. Looking at the PLOS ONE study in the context of other research, the literature seems to suggest that remaining active throughout the day (through intermittent standing in the workspace or daily walks) in addition to a HIIT routine can be the perfect combination to achieve both short- and long-term health and fitness goals.

What do you think? Weigh in below!

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Testosterone, Obesity, and Heart Disease

testosterone word in letterpress

credit: iStock @marekuliasz

When you hear the word testosterone, you probably think of masculinity, working out in the gym, and how efficiently someone can put on muscle and lose fat. Turns out, that’s only half the story.

As science dives deeper and deeper into these biomarkers, we’re finding that nothing is as cut and dry as we might have once thought. The body is a huge, complex, integrated system.

WebMD recently did an informative article on the correlations between low testosterone levels in men and a number of metabolic disorders, from diabetes and obesity to high blood pressure and heart disease.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Member Follow-up: Healing the Thyroid, Beat Cholesterol

credit: Instagram @lovedayyy

credit: Instagram @lovedayyy

We hoped you’ve enjoyed our week of testimonials! We really do have awesome members and just wanted to take some time out to highlight them, their awesome achievements, and give a real picture of what the WellnessFX experience is all about.

To cap off the week, we have a post from a veteran! Kristin Newman wrote about her experience nearly a year ago, when our blog was just a baby, which you can find here and here. We believe WellnessFX should be used as a way to track an individual’s on-going progress to achieve and maintain wellness, as the body is a constantly changing entity. So we’re happy to congratulate Kristin on getting her first follow-up!

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

WellnessFX Comes To The Tar Heel State!

Now Available In North Carolina. Click Here!

600px-Seal_of_North_CarolinaOne week into 2013 and WellnessFX has already opened up in three new states! In case you missed it, we’re now available in both Georgia and Washington, DC, and we just got confirmation that North Carolina can be added to that list.

Let it be known: even though we started in the West, we’re making a bold presence in the East!

If you live in North Carolina, maybe you’ve only skimmed over the site after finding out it wasn’t yet available in your state. Or maybe this is your first exposure to WellnessFX. Either way, we have a lot of resources to get you up to speed on the WellnessFX experience. Sign-up is easy, the blood draw is easy, and before you know it you’ll have the data you need to take control of your health, right at your fingertips! 

If you’re completely new to WellnessFX, check out what some of our members have to say about their potentially life-changing tests and consults:

This is a great way to start off 2013–and we don’t plan to stop anytime soon!

*If we haven’t made it to your state yet, don’t fret! It’s good you’re here! Leave us a comment. We’re constantly expanding and the more we hear from you, the sooner we’ll be available.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Extreme Wellness – A Member Testimonial

Jon 1 jon 1Thus continues our week of WellnessFX testimonials. As we expand, we want to make sure potential members newly exposed to WellnessFX get an accurate picture of what we offer, how easy the process is, and the types of real results you can achieve.

Today, our story is from the fitness blog Extreme Workout, which tracks Jon Luciano on his personal journey to wellness. Jon has very realistic goals, considering his awesome progress in the past. Between 2010 and 2011Jon went from 250 pounds and a BMI of 37.5 to 206 pounds and a BMI of 30.5. While up-to-date progress information isn’t available on the site, his 2013 goals are! They include reaching his target weight of 185 and participating in 6 athletic events.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

WellnessFX: Healthy Insights, Healthy Body, Healthy Mind

Rachel Quotes 1

Rachel knows that real health isn’t only about how you look, or how you feel. Like the old adage goes, it’s what’s on the inside that counts.

She came to WellnessFX through the FitFluential campaign already with this mindset. Still, WellnessFX “absolutely’ exceeded her expectations.

Although WellnessFX was not yet available in Massachusetts (we’re working on it!), Rachel traveled to her home town in Connecticut to have her draw. She documented her experience pretty thoroughly on her blog. Here’s a quick summary:

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.