Tag Archives: glucose

WellnessFX Releases New Dating App For Finding Your Perfect Match

Every year, hundreds of people find love on sites like Match.com, OkCupid, and It’s Just Lunch. But how well do these REALLY give you insight into knowing if you and your potential partner are a good match? Today, WellnessFX announces The Complete Package ®, our new dating app that matches you to your perfect soul mate using your biomarkers.

WellnessFX

The Complete Package

While other dating sites waste your time on banal details such as common interests, passions, and values, WellnessFX digs one level deeper. 

Using our unique, ground-breaking, comprehensive, super fancy, and innovative algorithm, we leverage influential biomarkers such as Glucose, Triglycerides, and Cortisol, to give you insight beyond the traditional Google/Facebook/Twitter/Instagram/un-signed in LinkedIn search n’ stalk.

Whether you’re looking for Mrs. Right, or Mr. Right Now, to find biomarker trend commonalities in a future mate, or just deciding if someone with high hs-CRP is right for you, with WellnessFX’s robust, cloud-based, synergistic game-changing platform, you can’t go wrong. Even our most basic package includes more tests than the routine checkup:

  • Personalized biomarker matchmaking – mobile and web access!
  • Quality matching of LDL and HDL cholesterol levels
  • Consulting appointments tailored to what you’re probably doing wrong on that 1st date
  • Guaranteed and personalized understanding of your health plus actionable ways to achieve optimal health.

Ready to get started? Great! We match you with WellnessFX members we we think you’ll enjoy enhancing your performance with.

WellnessFX’s The Complete Package* ®: When you still aren’t sure after creeping 33 Facebook photo albums and profile pictures. Twice.

Tweet us and let us know what you think. Your feedback is an important part of our process.

P.S. Happy April Fool’s Day, WellnessFX’ers. 

*Really not a product, guys. 

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Ben Greenfield on the 4 Dangers of a Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet

Credit: Flickr Commons, Adam Wyles

Credit: Flickr Commons, Adam Wyles

I personally have experimented with very low carbohydrate diets combined with extreme amounts of exercise and have certainly noticed issues on my biomarkers of which I would have never been aware if I weren’t testing and tracking – and these were serious issues that threatened Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Guest Post: Can You Build Muscle On A Low Carb Diet?

Ben Greenfield's Low-Carber brother, Zach Greenfield

Ben Greenfield’s Low-Carber brother, Zach Greenfield

Do you doubt that you can build muscle on a low carbohydrate diet because your muscles don’t have enough “fuel?” This is a common argument: that a low carb diet doesn’t give your muscles enough glycogen to produce a forceful contraction for muscle building and simultaneously robs you of precious protein-based amino acids for adequate repair and recovery.

I beg to differ.

First, it’s not just your waistline and hips that store fat. Your muscles actually store intramuscular fat and can call on this more immediate source of fat for energy if required. This fat is stored in the muscle tissue itself in the form of fat droplets. Because of its physical proximity to exercising muscles, it can be a very convenient source of fuel, especially for well-trained athletes who have higher levels of the fat burning enzyme lipoprotein lipase. They are able to utilize this fat source earlier and more efficiently than untrained individuals.

But that’s not all.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Customer Testimonial: The Last 15 Pounds

picisto-20130319175612-349782What does it take to lose 105 pounds?

Dedication. Discipline. Drive. And a little bit of direction and guidance.

Engineer Noel Dasta started her relationship with WellnessFX as a member and became an employee. Her customer experience not only helped her achieve a life-changing goal, but also taught her about her body and living a life of wellness. This is the story of how one woman took her life and her health into her own hands and made a lasting difference.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Latest in Health News: Gluten-Free, Detecting a Stroke, Health Care Spending, and More!

gluten-free

credit: NYTimes.com @Lou Beach

Gluten-Free, Whether You Need It or Not

There’s been a lot of talk recently about gluten, wheat, and the potential benefits of nixing them from your diet. We even featured our own article around the good and bad of grain consumption. But is it just another fad diet? Will it fade into the darkness like so many before it? Or is there actually something to it?

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Chilling the Fat Away

credit: Instagram @_haiibeautiful

credit: Instagram @_haiibeautiful

Have you ever delighted at the idea of working out in a hot gym or on a sunny, sweltering day because of all the extra calories you can imagine sweating through your pores? Or maybe you’ve sat for long periods of time in a sauna after a workout? Soaked in a hot bath to loosen up the muscles?

We aren’t knocking these methods, as heat exposure promotes blood flow to your skin, which can help with muscle repair and relaxation. But what if we told you cold showers, working out in the snow, and ice baths could be just as useful, if not more-so?

Do we have your attention? Good. Self-experimenter Tim Ferriss and popular personal trainer Ben Greenfield have both delved deep into cold thermogenesis over the past couple year. Each has incorporated various techniques into their regimens. An interesting trivia fact first led Tim Ferriss down the road of cold exposure: at a time, Michael Phelps was known to eat 12,000 calories per day. How was that possible, considering he’d have to swim continuously for 10 hours every single day to burn off that kind of intake? Then it hit him: Michael Phelps spent 3-4 hours a day in the water, which is 24 times more thermally conductive than air. His body was burning all those calories just to stay warm.

If he can, why can’t we?

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.