Tag Archives: fat

Why You Should Question the FDA’s New Nutrition Labeling Mandate 

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Miriella

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Miriella

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced its final rules for nationwide nutrition labeling on menus and vending machines. Calorie counts will now be required to be labeled on food and alcoholic beverages that are menu-listed. The guidelines are stricter than expected, as alcoholic beverages, which were not mentioned in earlier drafts, were added to the final guidelines.The FDA’s goal is to combat the obesity epidemic by making Americans more aware of how many calories are actually in their food. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Low Carb vs. Low Fat for Weight Loss – Which is Better? New Study Shows Truth.

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Chinkerfly

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Chinkerfly

Carbs and fat are hot topics when it comes to weight loss and overall health. Specifically, the debate between the two:

“Are carbs bad?”
“Not all carbs are bad.”
“What ARE carbs?”
“What kind of fat should I be eating?”
“What’s the difference between saturated and unsaturated fat?”
“Why is everyone putting coconut oil on everything?”
“Can you build muscle on a low carb diet?”

And on and on and on.

Not only is fat picking up traction in major press, but what health experts once touted as gospel truth – “Eat Low Fat” – is wrong. Most fat is good, and Carbs are getting a closer look. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

What You Don’t Know about Burning Fat

Credit: ThorneFX.com

Credit: ThorneFX.com

The old school methods of burning fat toggled between eating less and exercising more (the energy balance equation) or following a low-fat diet. For most people, this has not worked well and certainly not something that was sustainable long-term.

Most of the time, these types of practices result in Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Trailblazing Thursdays: What You Should Know About Tofu….

credit: Instagram @amandaleighmc

credit: Instagram @amandaleighmc

Many people choose to give up meat for a variety of reasons. Health, sustainability, cruelty to animals, the want to try new things. Whatever the reason, it’s safe to say that no one decides to go vegetarian or vegan with the goal of being unhealthy. This is exactly what may happen, however, without proper knowledge.

Once people give up on meat, the question becomes: where do I get my protein? Tofu has become a popular answer. It’s high in protein, has deep roots in Chinese cuisine, and can be prepared in a variety of ways similar to meat. But is it good for you?

Mark Sisson over at Mark’s Daily Apple wrote up a thoroughly informative article about tofu, soy beans, and processed foods in general. While tofu is a nice source of protein, it’s still a processed food and should be consumed as such: in moderation. The good news is that there are healthier alternatives to tofu which taste just as good, if not better.

Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Guest Post: Should You Get Your Thyroid Tested?

credit: iStock @hartphotography1

credit: iStock @hartphotography1

One of the growing epidemics in the U.S. is a disease called hypothyroidism. The thyroid is an organ that influences and inevitably controls every aspect of our being. In light of its critical role, it may come as a shock that as many as 50% of the more than 25 million people with thyroid problems remain undiagnosed.

The word “thyroid” comes from the ancient Greeks and appropriately means, “shield.” The thyroid gland not only shields the body from wearing down from stress and disease, but also serves as the major catalyst for stimulating energy, muscle growth, and a clear and sharp brain. A poorly functioning thyroid, for example, will interfere with exercise by either eliminating the possibility of building muscle or causing you to cancel your workouts altogether. As for keeping off the pounds, despite hours in the gym and low caloric intake, the body will be unable to lose weight. Even under otherwise ideal performance, the body will not be able to burn fat when the thyroid slows down. All in all, how the thyroid functions either makes or breaks performance in all areas of your life.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

“Carbs Are Killing You”

credit: Instagram @ deutschefrau

credit: Instagram @ deutschefrau

The Dilemma

In 1984 the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute set out to do a noble thing: fight heart disease, obesity, and all the complications that come with it. They launched a massive campaign to promote low-fat diets. Saturated fat consumption certainly went down, but obesity and diabetes levels went up.

The Study

This raised the question: is it really fat consumption that makes us fat? Researchers from Stanford University attempted to answer just that. The study was simple: one group ate all the fat and protein they wanted, but were restricted to 20-50 grams of carbohydrates per day while the other group was put on a calorie-restricted low-fat diet where carbs made up 55-60 percent of all calories. Both groups lost weight, but the low-carb group saw nearly twice the benefits in weight loss, triglyceride levels, and blood pressure.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.