Tag Archives: exercise

COMING SOON: 4-Part Webisode Series featuring Tim Ferriss: “Building the Perfect Human”

Self tracker, author, and luminary Tim Ferriss sits with the WellnessFX crew for an intimate 4-part talk about performance, longevity, and the future of healthcare. Check out the trailer!

Check back for the full-length webisodes – coming soon!

BUILDING THE PERFECT HUMAN is a trademark of Krisa Performance, LLC

 

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

How To Recover From Your Workouts As Fast As Possible – Beyond Nutrition with Ben Greenfield

credit: iStock @bytepark

credit: iStock @bytepark

From post-workout proprietary blends of fancy carbohydrates and protein…

…to special supplements like proteolytic enzymes, anti-inflammatory herbal cocktails, and essential amino acids…

…we’re taught time and time again to stuff our faces with foods, pills, capsules, powders, and liquids to fully enhance workout recovery.

But believe it or not, there are other strategies you can implement to bounce back from your workouts as fast as possible – simple strategies that tend to be forgotten or fly under the radar. After all, it’s easier to pop a pill post-workout than it is to spend five minutes on a foam roller.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Celiac Disease, Exercise to Sleep, Omega-3s for a Healthy Baby, and More!

Small two year old baby girl sleep in a bassinet on a airplane

credit: iStock @Nick_Thompson

National Sleep Foundation Poll Finds Exercise Key To Good Sleep

“Exercise is great for sleep. For the millions of people who want better sleep, exercise may help.” – David Cloud, CEO of the National Sleep Foundation (NSF)

Have you ever told someone how you ‘slept like a baby’ after a tough workout, or a long day of physical exertion? Well, it turns out you don’t have to climb Mount Kilamonjaro to get a good night’s rest. The results of the National Sleep Foundation’s 2013 Sleep in America® poll show just how beneficial exercise can be to a good night’s sleep:

  • Exercisers say they sleep better – Among people who sleep roughly the same amount each night, exercisers reported better sleep than non-exercisers. “If you are inactive, adding a 10 minute walk every day could improve your likelihood of a good night’s sleep,” says Max Hirshkowitz, PhD, poll task force chair.
  • Vigorous exercisers report the best sleep – Vigorous exercisers are almost twice as likely as non-exercisers to report “I had a good night’s sleep.” More than two-thirds of vigorous exercisers say they rarely have sleep problems such as waking up too early and difficulty falling asleep, while one-half of non-exercisers experienced these problems.
  • Non-exercisers are the sleepiest and have the highest risk for sleep apnea – Participants were evaluated on how ‘sleepy’ they were using a standard excessive sleepiness clinical screening measure. The poll found that non-exercisers had a high sleepiness level about twice as often as exercisers. Here’s an interesting finding: non-exercisers reported having trouble staying awake while driving nearly three times the rate of those who exercise. Non exercisers were more than two times as likely to have symptoms of sleep apnea (a serious medical condition in which a person stops breathing during sleep) than vigorous exercisers.
  • Less time sitting is associated with better sleep and health – How much data have we seen lately showing how much sitting is ruining our lives? This study also found that people who sit for less than eight hours a day are twice as more likely to say they have “very good” sleep quality than those who sit for eight hours or more. The same comparison is seen in overall health: non-sitters were twice as likely to report having ‘excellent health’.
  • Exercise at any time of day appears to be good for sleep – But when is the best time to exercise? As far away from bedtime as possible, right? Not exactly. According to the study, those who report exercising close to bedtime and earlier in the day do not demonstrate a difference in self-reported sleep quality. For most people, exercise at any time seems to be better for sleep than no exercise at all.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Blood, Stress and Diet – A Member Experience

credit: FunAndFit.org

credit: FunAndFit.org

The great thing about WellnessFX is it can be utilized at both the beginning of your road to wellness or after you’ve already spent half a lifetime devoted to health and fitness. There really is no ‘targeted group’: anyone who’s trying to improve and/or keep up their health can greatly benefit!

That said, we’re happy to welcome a new member into the WellnessFX family. Alexandra Williams runs her own fitness site, Fun and Fit, with Kymberly Williams-Evans. Together, these two experts host radio shows, teach classes, and have won many awards for their online content. Alexander recently got her blood drawn with WellnessFX Baseline as part of the FitFluential campaign and posted a nifty blog about her experience on her site. Here’s a summary:

  • Alexandra was in and out of her blood draw in 15 minutes!
  • She reported very good results–she was ‘green’ for nearly every category. She attributes this to ‘portion size and food selection.’
  • The only bad part of her results were her LDL (low-density lipoprotein) levels. This is otherwise known as ‘bad cholesterol’. Alexandra has a family history of bad cholesterol and thinks genetics is the main culprit, as she eats pretty cleanly.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

WellnessFX Comes To The Tar Heel State!

Now Available In North Carolina. Click Here!

600px-Seal_of_North_CarolinaOne week into 2013 and WellnessFX has already opened up in three new states! In case you missed it, we’re now available in both Georgia and Washington, DC, and we just got confirmation that North Carolina can be added to that list.

Let it be known: even though we started in the West, we’re making a bold presence in the East!

If you live in North Carolina, maybe you’ve only skimmed over the site after finding out it wasn’t yet available in your state. Or maybe this is your first exposure to WellnessFX. Either way, we have a lot of resources to get you up to speed on the WellnessFX experience. Sign-up is easy, the blood draw is easy, and before you know it you’ll have the data you need to take control of your health, right at your fingertips! 

If you’re completely new to WellnessFX, check out what some of our members have to say about their potentially life-changing tests and consults:

This is a great way to start off 2013–and we don’t plan to stop anytime soon!

*If we haven’t made it to your state yet, don’t fret! It’s good you’re here! Leave us a comment. We’re constantly expanding and the more we hear from you, the sooner we’ll be available.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Chilling the Fat Away

credit: Instagram @_haiibeautiful

credit: Instagram @_haiibeautiful

Have you ever delighted at the idea of working out in a hot gym or on a sunny, sweltering day because of all the extra calories you can imagine sweating through your pores? Or maybe you’ve sat for long periods of time in a sauna after a workout? Soaked in a hot bath to loosen up the muscles?

We aren’t knocking these methods, as heat exposure promotes blood flow to your skin, which can help with muscle repair and relaxation. But what if we told you cold showers, working out in the snow, and ice baths could be just as useful, if not more-so?

Do we have your attention? Good. Self-experimenter Tim Ferriss and popular personal trainer Ben Greenfield have both delved deep into cold thermogenesis over the past couple year. Each has incorporated various techniques into their regimens. An interesting trivia fact first led Tim Ferriss down the road of cold exposure: at a time, Michael Phelps was known to eat 12,000 calories per day. How was that possible, considering he’d have to swim continuously for 10 hours every single day to burn off that kind of intake? Then it hit him: Michael Phelps spent 3-4 hours a day in the water, which is 24 times more thermally conductive than air. His body was burning all those calories just to stay warm.

If he can, why can’t we?

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.