Tag Archives: Dr. Murdoc Khaleghi

Biomarker Series: Electrolytes – They Make You Tick

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Heart. Liver. Kidney. Blood pressure. All things any health-conscious person wants to keep in check. Electrolytes are a big part of all of this. Simply put, they are in every cell of the body, and are essential for various life processes. You’d be hard-pressed to find a function that didn’t involve a type of electrolyte somewhere along the line. For the sake of visualizing, here are some ways electrolytes regulate common bodily functions.

  • Electrolyte concentration differences between the inside and outside of cells create electrical pulses which allow your heart to beat
  • Electrolytes in the blood regulate osmotic pressure which controls the amount of fluids filtered and secreted by the kidneys
  • Maintaining a certain pH throughout the body (and being able to adjust for special needs–for example, acidic conditions to break down food in the stomach) is crucial to overall function. Electrolytes help keep this balance.
  • Your heart isn’t the only place where electrical pulses are needed. Every nerve in your body needs electrolytes to function properly. This involves thinking, moving, and even digestion!

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Biomarker Series: The Kidneys

Flickr Creative Commons_SteveDavis

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons_SteveDavis

We can’t live without our kidneys. Luckily, we are born with two, and if one goes on an extended vacation the other can step up and do the job, but without both, we’re toast. The kidneys are responsible for filtering our blood and getting rid of all the harmful waste materials from the many daily processes our cells undergo.

Urine is essentially filtered blood. When you drink fluid containing water, the water adds to your blood volume and your kidney adjusts how much is filtered to maintain a consistent blood pressure. That is why drinking a lot makes you go to the bathroom.

Also, it’s why dehydration is so bad for you. Your body needs to get rid of waste in the blood, but it can’t continue taking from the blood volume without anything to replace it (water). Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Biomarker Series: Love Your Liver

credit: Instagram @karmann79

Three guesses to what’s the largest internal organ in your body and has more than 500 functions? (don’t look at the title) Yep, that’s right: the liver! Many people wouldn’t be able to tell you why the liver is important off the top of their heads. This is because it has so many functions that it’s not known for any one thing. Some of the awesome functions your liver is carrying out right now include (but is not limited to):

  • Making all types of blood cells to carry out various activities throughout your body. Red blood cells to carry oxygen to your tissues and white blood cells to fight infection.
  • Metabolizing the cholesterol in your body
  • Helping to digest and store sugar for use as energy
  • Ridding your blood of nasty toxins before they can run amuck all over your body
  • Producing a new batch of bile to help you digest all those healthy fats you’ve been eating lately
  • Manufacturing nifty enzymes and proteins that will go out and be apart of most of the chemical reactions in your body. One example is blood clotting.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Biomarker Series: Happy Thyroid for A Happy Life

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Twelve percent of people have some sort of thyroid disease. That’s 1 out of every 8. Of those, sixty percent don’t know that they have it. All things considered, that means you have a 1 in 14 chance of having some type of thyroid disease you’re not aware of.

So what is the thyroid and why is it causing so many people problems (even problems, it seems, that they’re not aware of)? The thyroid gland is a hormone in the neck that controls how quickly the body uses energy. Simply put, the more thyroid you have working, the more energy you will burn up. Thyroid problems can come on both sides of the coin.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Biomarker Series: The Many Functions of Vitamin D

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Have you ever been jealous of plants? They have the awesome ability of turning sunlight into usable energy, or food. Believe it or not, us humans have a similar skill. We can use the energy of the sun directly to synthesize a very important hormone: Vitamin D. Pretty cool, huh?

Truth be told, most people these days can’t rely solely on the sun to get their vitamin D fix. We depend on our diet and sometimes supplements to give us the levels we need. Like most things in science, as time passes we’re gaining a better understanding of the hormone’s role in the body. Recently, we’ve seen evidence suggesting that there’s an optimal level of vitamin D, and it differs for everyone. That’s right: too much vitamin D can actually be bad for you.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Biomarker Series: Lipoprotein(a) – The Unwanted Guest in Cardiovascular Health

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You know that friend, family member, or co-worker who always seems to be trouble? You can’t pinpoint exactly what it is about them that makes the sun all of a sudden hide behind the clouds or guarantees a tightly knitted plan will crumble to pieces. But it’s there. That’s kind of like lipoprotein(a). We don’t know exactly what it does, but we know that high levels are correlated with heart disease. Just like that friend/cousin/co-worker, we have seen enough of the outcome to know it means trouble.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.