Tag Archives: cortisol

Weight Loss Stalled? You Might Want to Take a Look at This Hormone

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One of the most popular pieces of weight loss advice still passed around in conversation is the simple and  familiar “just eat less, move more.”

Seems easy enough, right? The less you eat, the less you should weigh over time.

Is it as simple as that or is there more? Spoiler alert: It’s not. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

4 Basic Facts Everyone Should Know About Cortisol

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Meet the hormone that responds to physical and mental stress, is highest in the morning and typically decreases throughout the day, and increases during times of starvation: Cortisol.

Because healthy cortisol levels are key to living a healthy life, here are four facts you should know about cortisol and how it impacts your body. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

5 Tips For Navigating Perimenopause

Healthy food clean eating selection: fish, fruit, vegetable, seeds, superfood, cereals, leaf vegetable on gray concrete background copy space

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For women experiencing perimenopause, the time during which your body makes the natural transition to menopause, navigating the transition can be daunting.

Symptoms that occur through the transition include irregular periods, hot flashes and sleep problems, mood changes, vaginal and bladder problems, decreasing fertility, changes in sexual function, loss of bone, and changing cholesterol levels.

Women start perimenopause at Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

How to Own Your: Stress (exercises included)

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Can your body tell you more about how you’re doing managing stress? Our biochemistry is telling us yes.

You’ve probably heard cortisol referred to as the “stress hormone.” Your adrenal glands make cortisol in an attempt to help your body handle stressful situations. While a little spike of cortisol is good in response to short-term stressors, it starts to become a problem when the body starts making too much, too often. High cortisol is an overreaction to chronic stress. This can lead to a number of unhealthy issues. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Tired All the Time? 4 Reasons That Could Explain Why

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Do you find yourself reaching for a third cup of coffee in the beginning of the day or wanting to nap under your desk? Do you notice that you can’t muster up the enthusiasm to hit the gym or go to that thing you said you’d go to? Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Think You’re Done with Cold & Flu Season? Not so fast

Close-up of ill woman in bed holding thermometer

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While you are more susceptible to getting a cold or flu during the peak months (December – March), a weakened immune system can and does happen year round. Common causes of catching a cold or flu include:

  • Through your mouth, eyes or nose, since the virus can spread through droplets in the air when someone who is sick coughs, sneezes or talks.
  • Hand-to-hand contact with someone who has a cold
  • Sharing contaminated objects, such as phones, utensils, towels, or toys
  • Touching your eyes, nose or mouth after such contact or exposure

Don’t let prevention be put on the back burner simply because you’re not sick. When you are sick you do everything you can to try to get better, but the easiest way to get better is not get sick!

For many their prevention plan consists of any or all of:
Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.