Tag Archives: celiac disease

Your Guide to Gluten: 5 Truths (and a lie)

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More and more conversations are being held around food sensitivity, which is bringing more culprits into the spotlight. We recently discussed FODMAPs, so now is as good a time as any to help decode gluten, as it seems some are still in confusion.

Gluten, as related to food sensitivity, is often discussed alongside Celiac disease, a digestive and autoimmune disorder. A study done by the Mayo Clinic and the National Institutes of Health estimates that about 1 in 141 people in the U.S. have celiac disease, although the disease often goes undiagnosed.

Whether you know someone with Celiac disease, think you might be gluten intolerant, or just want to know what everyone is arguing about, we’ve created a quick run-down to help you decode what gluten is, isn’t, and where it can be found. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Celiac Disease, Exercise to Sleep, Omega-3s for a Healthy Baby, and More!

Small two year old baby girl sleep in a bassinet on a airplane

credit: iStock @Nick_Thompson

National Sleep Foundation Poll Finds Exercise Key To Good Sleep

“Exercise is great for sleep. For the millions of people who want better sleep, exercise may help.” – David Cloud, CEO of the National Sleep Foundation (NSF)

Have you ever told someone how you ‘slept like a baby’ after a tough workout, or a long day of physical exertion? Well, it turns out you don’t have to climb Mount Kilamonjaro to get a good night’s rest. The results of the National Sleep Foundation’s 2013 Sleep in America® poll show just how beneficial exercise can be to a good night’s sleep:

  • Exercisers say they sleep better – Among people who sleep roughly the same amount each night, exercisers reported better sleep than non-exercisers. “If you are inactive, adding a 10 minute walk every day could improve your likelihood of a good night’s sleep,” says Max Hirshkowitz, PhD, poll task force chair.
  • Vigorous exercisers report the best sleep – Vigorous exercisers are almost twice as likely as non-exercisers to report “I had a good night’s sleep.” More than two-thirds of vigorous exercisers say they rarely have sleep problems such as waking up too early and difficulty falling asleep, while one-half of non-exercisers experienced these problems.
  • Non-exercisers are the sleepiest and have the highest risk for sleep apnea – Participants were evaluated on how ‘sleepy’ they were using a standard excessive sleepiness clinical screening measure. The poll found that non-exercisers had a high sleepiness level about twice as often as exercisers. Here’s an interesting finding: non-exercisers reported having trouble staying awake while driving nearly three times the rate of those who exercise. Non exercisers were more than two times as likely to have symptoms of sleep apnea (a serious medical condition in which a person stops breathing during sleep) than vigorous exercisers.
  • Less time sitting is associated with better sleep and health – How much data have we seen lately showing how much sitting is ruining our lives? This study also found that people who sit for less than eight hours a day are twice as more likely to say they have “very good” sleep quality than those who sit for eight hours or more. The same comparison is seen in overall health: non-sitters were twice as likely to report having ‘excellent health’.
  • Exercise at any time of day appears to be good for sleep – But when is the best time to exercise? As far away from bedtime as possible, right? Not exactly. According to the study, those who report exercising close to bedtime and earlier in the day do not demonstrate a difference in self-reported sleep quality. For most people, exercise at any time seems to be better for sleep than no exercise at all.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Wheat Allergies and Cholesterol: A WellnessFX Member Success Story

Drina BobanA person can be shaped good, but not in good shape . . .

The Problem

Virtually everyone who works at WellnessFX is a health nut (as you can imagine, we love what we do). As the saying goes: we eat our own dogfood, and we eat it well! Our Wellness Network Development Director Drina Boban is no exception. She was a serious triathlete for many years and even competed in the 2004 USA National Championships. While she no longer races, Drina has maintained her commitment to living a healthy and active lifestyle. She eats well, is an avid runner and cyclist, and swims or lifts weights several times a week in addition to teaching boot camp classes on the side.

When she had her first draw at WellnessFX back in May of 2011, she expected her numbers to reflect how she felt: darn good. Her only problem was a mild wheat allergy, but seeing as how she didn’t experience any of the common GI issues that comes with it, it was easy to forget about. She had no complaints. In short, she was super healthy, and her numbers were going to be super healthy. But that wasn’t quite the case.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

The Grains Debate – How Good For You Are They, Really?

Photo Credit: @status9 via Flickr 

Edible grains comprise the majority of global cultivated crops and provide the greatest percentage of consumed calories worldwide, in the form of corn, rice, wild rice, wheat, barley, rye, kamut, spelt, millet, oats, triticale, buckwheat, quinoa, teff, and amaranth. Grains, however, are currently in the middle of a public relations nightmare. As an increasing number of people report incredible health improvements from the adoption of gluten-free or Paleo diets, the family of foods known as “cereals” is rapidly losing its status as a health food group. In fact, now, some would even refer to them as flat-out toxic.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.