Tag Archives: Brian MacKenzie

Performance and Mobility with CrossFit Endurance

credit: Instagram @amofitness

Practice. Practice. Practice.

Makes perfect. Right?

Maybe. But then again, maybe not. Traditionally, the idea is: want to get better at running? Run a lot. Swimming? Swim until you sprout gills. Biking? Bike until . . . you get the picture.

CrossFit Endurance founder Brian MacKenzie has a new book out where he talks about these questions and more: Power Speed ENDURANCE. Brian came by the WellnessFX offices to chat with our CEO Jim Kean about his new book, the common problems with posture and mobility, and how weight training can help break years of bad habits. Here’s a snippet of their conversation:

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

The Body’s Fuel System with CrossFit Endurance

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What would you say about an athlete who shows up for an endurance event after months of eating hardly any carbs?

I hope he’s on my team.

Ultra-marathoner Tim Olson recently won theWestern States 100-mile Endurance Run and beat the course record by 21 minutes! How did he do it? By training his fuel system.

CrossFit Endurance founder Brian MacKenzie recently sat down with WellnessFX CEO Jim Kean. They talked about Tim, his diet, and the body’s fuel system. Brian then goes on to share tips from his own diet during training and leading up to a competitive event.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Optimal Health Webinar Series – Nutrition at the Cellular Level (12/11/12)

credit: Instagram @saluterv

credit: Instagram @saluterv

What do you do when you have relationships with several awesome individuals with so much knowledge to share, and an equally awesome community of active learners? Well, you bring the two together, of course!

WellnessFX is doing just that in a series of webinars starting next month. The Optimal Health Webinar Series will feature some of the hottest names in health, fitness, and prevention. Here’s who you can look forward to:

Our first of the series, Nutrition at the Cellular Level, will be with health innovator and author Ashley Tudor. Fresh off the release of her new book Sweet Potato Power: Smart Carbs, Your Body Your Rules, she’ll talk with us about the pillars of optimal health – food, hormones, inflammation, and activity. WellnessFX CEO and Founder Jim Kean will moderate. You will be able to ask questions during the event, or you can send them beforehand via Facebook, Twitter, or comment right here on the blog!

Optimal Health Wellness Series: Nutrition at the Cellular Level will take place on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 10:00AM PT.

Click Here to sign up now!


In this 60-minute webinar you’ll learn:

  • How to listen to the messages your body sends
  • How your cells respond to hormones like insulin and how insulin levels contribute to weight gain more than fat
  • How to track health markers in order to address and treat warning signs before they become problems

Be sure to sign up and get your questions ready! We hope you join us in our never ending quest for health, wellness, and knowledge!

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

CrossFit Endurance & WellnessFX: The Wrap-Up

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Imagine you’re in the middle of a car race. Your foot is pressing the gas all the way down. You’re pushing your car to the max. Strange sounds start to come from the engine. Smoke leaks from under the hood. Your car is overheating. It can’t go on for much further. You look over and see your opponent easily keeping up with you, a smile on his face. He looks at you, laughs, and puts the pedal to the metal. He slips past effortlessly. All around, cars pass, leaving yours last and running out of gas. What was the difference? You brought a six-cylinder engine to a twelve-cylinder race.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

CrossFit Endurance & Wellness FX Series: Part 3

credit: Instagram @innerfit

When we lose blood, our heart pumps faster and our vessels constrict to increase blood pressure. When we lift weights over long periods of time, our hands develop protective calluses. Our bodies are constantly adapting. As discussed in last week’s video, the fuel system of the body is no exception. When conditions are ‘easy’ it becomes lax and less efficient at what it does: turning food into usable energy. Athletes shouldn’t want their bodies to get used to ‘easy.’ Would you drive a car around a track to prepare for a foot race?

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

CrossFit Endurance & WellnessFX Series: Part 2

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Are you satisfied with your athletic performance? Do you find yourself worrying about your athletic potential as you age? Many athletes don’t notice the affects of nutrition on performance until later in life and spend years dodging their true potential. By focusing on the factors that differentiate top end athleticism between the 1 and 3%, individuals can eliminate holes in their game before they even appear.

In last week’s discussionCrossFit Endurance founder Brian MacKenzie and WellnessFX  CEO Jim Kean touched on how athletes can push towards peak performance. In the second part of our CrossFit Endurance & WellnessFX series, Dr. Justin Mager walks Brian through our body’s fuel system and why the traditional American diet is not optimal for athletic training.

In a nut shell, the body’s fuel system works as such:

  • Fuel in the form of carbs, proteins, or fats are used to produce acetyl-CoA, an important coenzyme involved in metabolism
  • Acetyl-CoA moves into the mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell
  • Mitochondria use acetyl-CoA to generate ATP, the body’s ‘unit of currency’ for energy transfer

We’ve been told time and time again that high-carb diets are the best way to feed this fuel system due to its role in aerobic activity. Surprisingly enough, however, fat is the fuel of choice when the body is in the oxidative state experienced during endurance exercise. Because it takes longer to process, fat as fuel puts ‘stress’ on the system, but the overall energy output is greater. Much like athletic training itself, this stress is a good thing! More mitochondria are generated to deal with the ‘stress’ and the body becomes more efficient at turning all types of fuel into energy. When the system is instead bombarded with carbs, the ‘easy’ fuel source, mitochondria levels decrease and the efficiency of the entire system drops. Come performance time, it’s obvious which system will come out on top!

As Brian can attest to, high carbohydrate diets can be adequate for endurance training. But why settle for adequate, when you can have optimal?

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.