Tag Archives: blood sugar

6 Small Things You Can Do to Kickstart Your Healthier Year

smart phone on table with latte

Flickr Creative Commons_Marco Verch

A big lifestyle change can seem daunting, but taking small steps can make your goal both manageable and possible.

You don’t have to wait until January 1 to take action, you can start right now. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Ask the Practitioner: 3 Habits That Can Mess With Women’s Hormones–and how to better balance them

credit: iStock photo

Courtney Jonson L.Ac., FM Practitioner

What do TSH, vitamin D (yup) and estrogen have in common? These hormones and many others play an important role in how you function and go about your day. Did you know that an imbalance of hormones could impact your weight loss, longevity, sleep, and even mood? We asked WellnessFX practitioner, Functional Medicine Practitioner, and Licensed Acupuncturist, Courtney Jonson to weigh in. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

You May Be Testing Your Blood Sugar Wrong – Here’s How to Do it Right

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Image Credit: Creative Commons Phillip Jeffrey

The Missing Pieces of Blood Sugar Lab Tests

Sometimes, standard biomarkers don’t tell the entire story about health risks.

Aside from blood sugar (glucose), consider these two additional biomarkers for assessing risk of diabetes — a chronic elevation of blood sugar that can increase risk of heart disease, and dysfunction with the kidneys, nerves, and eyes — (1) insulin and (2) hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The tests are performed concurrently on the same individual, and tracked over time.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Are These 3 Popular Sugar Alternatives Healthy?

wfx.sugar-alternatives
Image: 
Alden Chadwick

In the pursuit to consume less sugar and stabilize blood sugar, we may use sweeteners like aspartame (“Equal”), sorbitol, sucralose (“Splenda”) or saccharin (“Sweet n Low”). Although these sweeteners have been approved by the FDA as “Generally Recognized As Safe” (GRAS), they are also known to present significant health costs.

Health Costs Associated with Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners also make a difficult baking substitute. Due to different sweetness-to-volume ratios than sugar, they aren’t necessarily compatible for certain recipes, making

Fortunately, there are more natural alternative sweeteners available. Here are a few that are growing in popularity and increasingly found in products and cabinets.

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The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Artificial Sweeteners and Gut Health: Are They Linked?

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Sharon & Nikki McCutcheon

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Sharon & Nikki McCutcheon

Taste without the calories – is this a dream come true? For food marketers, yes. But if you’re a consumer interested in living a healthy lifestyle, not so much.

An average consumer mindful of calories may often opt for artificial sugar that are baked into protein bars, sprinkled in their coffee, or a part of their daily diet soda habit. Artificial sweeteners are regulated by the FDA, and defined by the Mayo Clinic as any sweetener that you use instead of regular table sugar (sucrose). Artificial sweeteners are many times sweeter – anywhere from 40 to 8,000x sweeter – than regular sugar.

Artificial sugars can be found in just about any grocery store shelf item, from chewing gum and cookies to sports drinks and soda. Typically the products are marked as “sugar-free,” or “diet.” Some foods contain multiple forms of these sweeteners to either lower the calorie/sugar gram count in their nutrition facts labeling or to maintain structure or shelf stability.

Credit: Flickr creative commons, m01229

Artificial sweeteners are typically found in the products marked as “sugar-free.” | Credit: Flickr creative commons, m01229

Unfortunately,  Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

4 Lifestyle Changes to Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Carlos let´s go

Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Carlos let´s go

For those with a high risk of Type 2 diabetes — 86 million Americans over the age of 20, according to the American Diabetes Association — glucose is the name of the game.

Glucose, the main type of sugar that circulates in your Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.