Category Archives: Lifestyle

3 Easy Habits You Can Start Today That Help Protect Your Immunity

Mature man cleans and disinfects his smart phone in the office, using disposable wipes.

credit: iStockphoto

While we all have a few tried and true practices that help us protect against a cold in the winter months, the reality is that your immune system needs attention all year around. 

Here are 3 immune-protecting best practices and precautions you can work into your everyday life, as soon as today.

3 Easy Habits You Can Start Today That Help Protect Your Immunity 

1. Wash your hands as soon as you return home.

Washing your hands promotes a healthy immune system because you’re actively working to prevent germs from getting into your body. We touch openings on our faces – eyes, nose, mouth – many times per day, so what we do with our hands significantly impacts our immunity. 

Common contaminated surfaces, in addition to doorknobs and handrails, include:

  • Credit card machines at stores
  • ATM buttons
  • Your phone and keys
  • Computer keyboards
  • Menus at restaurants (this applies even if you’re doing just take out)

Therefore, hand washing after touching contaminated surfaces may be the most powerful way to limit exposure. It’s also pretty easy to incorporate.

Try picking one or two activities you do daily – such as returning home after being outside – and commit to washing your hands before and/or after.

Pro tip: While using hand sanitizer is not a substitute for washing your hands, it can be useful in situations where hand washing is not an option.

2. Clean all your electronic devices every evening.

Your phone, laptop, remote controls, tablet, cameras, e-reader, gaming consoles, headphones, and any other electronic devices you use regularly will come in contact with other contaminated surfaces such as countertops.

Get in the habit of cleaning your devices – front and back – with an alcohol-based wipe. 

Pro tip: Try to wash your hands after using your phone, especially if you’re going to eat a meal or snack.

3. Power down devices one hour before bedtime

Creating a sleep routine is part of making a concerted effort to use rest as a proactive action to protect your immunity. 

Why is sleep so important? Because while one sleepless night won’t hurt, chronic sleep deprivation can take a toll on the body. In addition to fatigue, stress, irritability, cognitive impairment, imbalanced mood, memory loss, there is also connection to lowered immunity, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and diabetes.

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, blue light emitted by devices affects the body’s circadian rhythm, our natural wake and sleep cycle. “Too much blue light exposure late at night from your phone, tablet or computer can make it harder to get to sleep.” In this 2015 study, participants reading a light-emitting eBook took longer to fall asleep and had reduced evening sleepiness, reduced melatonin secretion, later timing of their circadian clock, and reduced next-morning alertness

Try creating a step-by-step “get ready for bed” routine for yourself that fits your schedule and needs, and then follow it as consistently as you can. Include all the steps you want – how you get ready for bed, when you adjust the lights, and even what time you limit your phone/laptop/TV/social media use.

Pro Tip: If you’re tired all the time or suffering from poor quality sleep, check out 4 reasons that could explain why. 

Bonus Habit:  Have Water Drinking Goals – and then hit them!

Water consumption is an important part of overall health – your body depends on it. It’s instrumental in healthy organ function, naturally improves digestion to help break down foods, and softens stools, which helps prevent constipation. 

Pro Tip: Invest in a reusable water bottle (BPA-free plastic or glass). You can fill up after you get through security, and then you can take it with you wherever you go – at coffee shops, restaurants, when at your relatives’ house.

It may take a moment to pick up the habit, but what you’re doing is creating the opportunity to drink more water. If you don’t create it, it doesn’t exist. Read here for more tips and tricks to help you drink more water.

How WellnessFX Can Help

Regular blood screening is crucial for understanding your hormones, tracking progress, and measuring your associated risk, to hopefully stop a problem before it becomes a problem.

WellnessFX is now offering a custom panel designed with your immunity in mind. This limited-time diagnostic package tests markers and panels such as:

  • CBC (Complete Blood Count), including white blood cell count and distribution of immune cells
  • hs-CRP, a marker of inflammation (which impairs the immune system)
  • Vitamin D, a core regulator of the immune system that many of us are deficient in
  • Chemistry panel (CMP), including major organ function, blood sugar, and electrolytes associated with hydration
  • Your Blood Type

Current pricing is $124 and it’s accessible for purchase through this link: 

Purchase Immunity Panel

Get the data you need in order to make educated, informed choices that fit your body’s specific and unique needs, from nutrition and lifestyle changes to hormone and risk monitoring.

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

Ben Greenfield’s Top Two Recommended Ways To Fast For Longevity

Credit: iStock Photo

This is a guest post from WellnessFX practitioner, Ben Greenfield. Greenfield is an ex-bodybuilder, Ironman triathlete, Spartan racer, coach, speaker and author of the New York Times Bestseller “Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health and Life.” Ben blogs and podcasts at BenGreenfieldFitness.com, and resides in Spokane, WA with his wife and twin boys. To learn more about Ben’s practice, education, and specialties, skip to the bottom! 

While they are unlikely to be familiar with popular fasting acronyms such as CR, IF, DTRF, ADF or FMD, centenarians in Blue Zones like Nicoya, Sardinia and Okinawa tend to eat relatively small portions of whole foods, consuming a low to moderate calorie diet by being mindful of their hunger and avoiding calorie-dense, fat- and sugar-laden processed and packaged foods.

Okinawans practice the traditional cultural rule of hara hachi bu, which means eating only until they are about 80% full. Typically, most meals are consumed within an 8- to 12-hour feeding window throughout the day, referred to by researchers as a “compressed feeding window.” This is the same window observed in many of the new, Westernized forms of fasting- or caloric-restriction-based diets, most of which involve at least 12 to 16 hours of not consuming calories during a given 24-hour period.

So why do all these different forms of fasting seem to work so well? You’re about to discover why, along with a quick primer on fasting and the two methods of fasting that I’ve personally found to be most effective for me and my clients. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

4 Steps for a Healthier Gut (and why it’s so important)

Studio shot of young African man hand on gut against gray background horizontal shot

Credit: iStockPhoto

A healthy microbiome is key to living a healthy life. As more research is conducted on gut health and the 5 lbs of bacteria that reside in your body, researchers continue to make discoveries about its connection to a variety of diseases and conditions, from anxiety and mood to obesity and IBS. Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

“Am I Overtraining?” What this Performance Nutritionist Learned Through Blood Testing.

young sport woman running upstairs on city stairs

Meet Kyla Channell, a 29-year old Performance Nutritionist from California. When she’s not gardening or hiking with her dog, she loves to listen to crime podcasts and spend time with

credit: Kyla Channell

family and friends. She currently manages and maintains her health with frequent blood tests and supplementing as necessary. Her diet consists of whole, unprocessed foods and exercise 3-6x/wk with a combination of activities like mountain biking, Bikram yoga, strength training, trail running, and swimming.

Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

4 Reasons Every Woman Should Be Paying Attention to Her Thyroid

Thyroid _Woman hand pulling a contraceptive pills blister from a bag

Credit: iStock Photo

The thyroid, the butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck, can either make or break performance in all areas of life.  Identifying thyroid dysfunction is key to living a healthy and productive life, especially for women. In fact, according to the American Thyroid Association, women are 5 to 8 times more likely than men to have thyroid problems! Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.

5 Tips For Navigating Perimenopause

Healthy food clean eating selection: fish, fruit, vegetable, seeds, superfood, cereals, leaf vegetable on gray concrete background copy space

Credit: iStock Photo

For women experiencing perimenopause, the time during which your body makes the natural transition to menopause, navigating the transition can be daunting.

Symptoms that occur through the transition include irregular periods, hot flashes and sleep problems, mood changes, vaginal and bladder problems, decreasing fertility, changes in sexual function, loss of bone, and changing cholesterol levels.

Women start perimenopause at Continue reading

The posts on this blog are for information only, and are not intended to substitute for a doctor-patient or other healthcare professional-patient relationship nor do they constitute medical or healthcare advice of any kind. Any information in these posts should not be acted upon without consideration of primary source material and professional input from one's own healthcare professionals.